soup

Hupa Paukena (Pumpkin Soup)

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This is another staple in our whare.  We get a paukena in our Ooooby box every now and then so I pretty much use the whole thing to make a big pot of soup and then freeze it in jars for lunches.  I’ve also added in a couple of kāreti (carrots) and some kumara too.  You can either follow the recipe below or put everything in a crock-pot, cook until the pumpkin breaks up and then mash together or cheat like me and use a stick blender.  You can also omit the spices and put in a couple of tablespoons of curry paste.  Or you can also add a couple of tablespoons of peanut butter for a satay flavour.

Kīnaki:

  • Cooking oil
  • 1 onion
  • 1/2 a medium-sized pumpkin
  • 2 cloves of crushed/diced garlic
  • 12teaspoon salt
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon dried chilli flakes (or some sriracha sauce)
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 can of coconut milk (optional)
  • Some coconut yogurt to serve (optional)

Huarahi:

Brown garlic and onion in a saucepan and then add the spices with a little bit of water so they don’t stick to the pan.  Set these aside.

Cube pumpkin (and other veggies if using these) and boil these in a large saucepan.  When pumpkin starts to break up, take off the heat.  Drain the vegetables (but keep the water so that you can add it in as you go.  You might use all of it to get the right consistency, but if you don’t keep the left-over water to use for stock (put it in the fridge or freezer).

Add the onion, garlic and spice mix to the paukena and mash (or blend using stick mixer).  Return mix to heat.  Add in the pumpkin water bit by bit until you get the consistency you want.  Alternatively, you could add in some coconut milk for a creamier mix.

This freezes well (even with the coconut milk in it.)

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Easy Miso Ramen Soup

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It’s been getting a bit makariri the last few nights so I decided to have a go at a hot and spicy noodle soup.  Pak choi came in our Ooooby box this week (post on this veggie box delivery initiative to follow) but I am really keen to try this with some watercress and puha as a substitute (need to go on a foraging mission this weekend!).  This recipe is enough for two hungry pakeke!

Kīnaki:

Broth

  • 2 tsp sesame or vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 spring onion, diced
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • 5 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 Tbsp miso paste
  • 1 red chilli sliced in half lengthways, seeds removed (I put this in whole to flavour the broth and then take it out before serving) – optional

Soup ingredients

  • Ramen noodles (I used 1.5 bundles of these ones)
  • 6 button mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 2 small bunches of pak choi (I chop the stem into chunks and put the leaves in whole)
  • 1/2 block firm tofu
  • 1 spring onions, diced
  • some toasted sesame seeds and chilli flakes for serving (you could also add some fresh bean sprouts)

Huarahi:

Heat the sesame oil in a large saucepan and add the minced garlic, ginger, and 1 diced spring onion.  Fry these until slightly brown and then add the vegetable stock.  Add the whole chilli to the stock and simmer.

Ladle a cup or so of the broth into a pyrex jug or bowl.  Add in the miso and then whisk until it has broken up and dissolved.  Return this mixture to the broth.

Remove the chilli.  Add the ramen noodles, the mushrooms, the tofu and some of the pak choi.  Cook until the noodles are ready.

Serve in deep bowls with the rest of the pak choi added at the last minute.  Top with the spring onions, toasted sesame seeds and chilli flakes.

 

 

 

Phở

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This is a really tasty version of phở – Vietnamese noodle soup.  You can mix up the toppings that you use, depending on what’s cheap or what you have growing at your whare – you don’t need to use everything I’ve listed (i.e. it looks like you need heaps but really you can make it as simple or as complicated as you want).  Leave out the chilli if you’d rather have a savoury soup than a spicy one.  Some nice substitutions are: lightly stir-fried or steamed green beans, broccoli or cauliflower, or oyster mushrooms instead of the button variety.

Kīnaki (serves 4)

For stock

  • 1 x onion
  • 2 x garlic cloves (or a teaspoon of crushed garlic)
  • 4 thin slices of fresh ginger (or a teaspoon of crushed ginger)
  • 9 cups of vegetable stock (or 8 cups of water and 4 teaspoons of vegetable bullion)
  • 4 x cloves
  • 1 x stick of cinnamon (or 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon)
  • 1 x star anise
  • 1 x fresh red chilli, diced

Noodles & toppings

  • 2 x tablespoons chopped mint
  • 2 x tablespoons chopped coriander
  • 2 x sliced spring onions (you can cut these on the diagonal to look flash…)
  • 2 x handful of bean sprouts
  • 1 x packet of firm tofu, drained and cut into slices.
  • 8 or so white button mushrooms
  • 1 x small bunch of pak choy
  • Crushed peanuts or cashews
  • Rice noodles

Huarahi

To make the broth, add the stock, garlic, ginger, cloves, cinnamon, chilli and star anise to a large pot.  Roughly chop the onion and add this to the mix.  Bring it to the boil and then turn down the heat and let it simmer away.  Set a timer for 15 minutes.

While the broth is cooking, prepare the noodles and the fresh ingredients.

I usually use white vermicelli noodles – to prepare these they just need to be soaked in cold water for a few minutes.  Drain them and then place a handful of noodles into each bowl you are using to serve your phở.

Cut up the pak choy – I like to cut a few slices off the stalk as those are nice and crunchy, and then cut the rest of it lengthways into a couple of long, green bits from each leaf.  Set these aside.

Heat a little sesame oil in a large pan to cook the tofu (if you want you can add a little garlic and freshly grated ginger to season the tofu a little).  Add the tofu slices and cook until brown on all sides.  Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside.  Return the pan to the stove, add a little more sesame oil and fry the mushrooms.  Once tender, remove these from the pan also and set aside.

Once the 15 minute timer goes off, add the pak choy to your stock and set the timer for another 5 minutes.

Now prepare the bowls for serving. Place some bean sprouts on top of the noodles.  Add a few slices of tofu and some mushrooms to each bowl.  Once the timer goes off, ladle some of the soup into each bowl (avoiding the large chunks of onion, star anise etc.  Make sure you get a few slices of the pak choy though.)

Top each bowl with some spring onions, some mint and coriander, a sprinkle of the crushed nuts (and add a little sriracha if you like it spicy).