Kai Māmā (Easy Meals)

Tofu, puha, tomato scramble

Screen Shot 2018-11-18 at 6.37.33 PM

Just a quick update on a parakuihi recipe I shared earlier.  The puha is growing strong in our backyard at the moment so I’ve been putting it into most things at the moment and it goes great in this tofu scramble recipe.

You can also serve with some sliced fresh tomato, or add that to the scramble too, as well as some mushrooms or capsicum.

Kīnaki (serves 2-3)

  • 1 block of firm style tofu
  • 1 small onion – diced finely
  • 1 clove diced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 1.5 tablespoons nutritional yeast
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
  • A little sesame oil for cooking

Huarahi

Mix together the soy sauce, nutritional yeast, turmeric, cumin and 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and set aside.

Press any excess moisture out of the tofu (I use some muslin cloths for this).

Heat some sesame oil in a frying pan.  When sizzling, add chopped onion and garlic and fry until slightly brown.  Add the tofu by crumbling it into the pan and breaking down any big bits with a wooden spoon.  Add the seasoning mixture and stir to make sure all of the tofu is well coated.

Serve as it is, or on top of toasted bread.

 

Advertisements

Easy Avocado Pasta

Screen Shot 2018-10-08 at 09.46.20

$2 avos – a rare treat. This is a super-easy pasta sauce that’s great for summer.  You can also jazz this up a bit with a tablespoon of nutritional yeast if you want a slightly more cheesy flavour.  Lemon juice is a must – it keeps the avo from turning brown too quickly.

Kīnaki:

  • 1-2 ripe avocados
  • Juice from medium-sized lemon
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • Pasta

Optional extras:

  • Fresh or dried basil
  • Roasted garlic
  • Sundried tomatoes or fresh cherry tomatoes
  • Capers
  • Nutritional yeast

Huarahi:

Cook the pasta according to instructions on the packet.  While pasta is cooking, just blend or mash up avocado and then add the rest of the ingredients.  Drain pasta, stir through a little olive oil, and then stir through the pasta sauce.  Serve immediately.  (This is also goes well with some rocket on the side.)

Huamata Rīwai (Potato Salad)

Screen Shot 2018-06-02 at 4.52.50 PM

We got some waiporoporo potatoes in our Ooooby box this week so I decided to use a few of them for a potato salad; that way I could also try out some homemade plant-based the brine from a can of chickpeas I’ve been meaning to try for ages.

I used some canned corn, some finely diced kale, chopped spring onion, and some toasted black and white sesame seeds to finish it off.  It was a hit in our whare!

Kīnaki:

Wairanu huamata (salad mayonnaise) makes about 1.5 cups

  • 3 tbsp of liquid from can of chickpeas (I made some hummus at the same time so just used the brine from the can of chickpeas.  Apparently the liquid lasts a few days in the fridge and can also be frozen.)
  • 1.5 tbsp rice vinegar
  • 1 tsp dijon or wholegrain
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • some cracked black pepper to taste
  • 1 cup neutral oil (I used light olive oil)
  • Some lemon-juice squeezed in is also nice

Huamata (salad)

  • 6 or so medium sized potatoes
  • 1 spring onion, diced
  • 1/2 can of corn kernels
  • 1/2 cup of finely shredded kale, silverbeet, or spinach
  • 2 tablespoons of toasted sesame seeds
  • You could also add some fresh herbs,

Huarahi:

To make the mayo, combine all of the ingredients in a jug (taller the better) and then whizz together with a stick blender or hand beater.  The chickpea brine whips up quite easily to form the colour and consistency of mayo.  Adjust seasoning according to taste.

Dice the potatoes (I leave skins on) and cook until just tender.  Run under some cold water and leave to drain and cool.  Once they have cooled, put into a bowl and add about 1/2 of the mayo you’ve made (the rest will keep in the fridge for a couple of weeks).  Stir through the onion, corn, and kale.  Top with toasted sesame seeds.

Screen Shot 2018-06-02 at 4.59.39 PM

Easy Miso Ramen Soup

Screen Shot 2018-03-19 at 10.28.42 AM

It’s been getting a bit makariri the last few nights so I decided to have a go at a hot and spicy noodle soup.  Pak choi came in our Ooooby box this week (post on this veggie box delivery initiative to follow) but I am really keen to try this with some watercress and puha as a substitute (need to go on a foraging mission this weekend!).  This recipe is enough for two hungry pakeke!

Kīnaki:

Broth

  • 2 tsp sesame or vegetable oil
  • 2 tsp minced garlic
  • 1 spring onion, diced
  • 1 tsp minced ginger
  • 5 cups vegetable stock
  • 2 Tbsp miso paste
  • 1 red chilli sliced in half lengthways, seeds removed (I put this in whole to flavour the broth and then take it out before serving) – optional

Soup ingredients

  • Ramen noodles (I used 1.5 bundles of these ones)
  • 6 button mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 2 small bunches of pak choi (I chop the stem into chunks and put the leaves in whole)
  • 1/2 block firm tofu
  • 1 spring onions, diced
  • some toasted sesame seeds and chilli flakes for serving (you could also add some fresh bean sprouts)

Huarahi:

Heat the sesame oil in a large saucepan and add the minced garlic, ginger, and 1 diced spring onion.  Fry these until slightly brown and then add the vegetable stock.  Add the whole chilli to the stock and simmer.

Ladle a cup or so of the broth into a pyrex jug or bowl.  Add in the miso and then whisk until it has broken up and dissolved.  Return this mixture to the broth.

Remove the chilli.  Add the ramen noodles, the mushrooms, the tofu and some of the pak choi.  Cook until the noodles are ready.

Serve in deep bowls with the rest of the pak choi added at the last minute.  Top with the spring onions, toasted sesame seeds and chilli flakes.

 

 

 

Baked Potato Kaimanga Style

Screen Shot 2018-03-09 at 7.51.07 AM.png

This is more just a prompt or idea for kai instead of a step by step recipe as it is pretty straightforward.  Baked potatoes are often associated with cheese, sour cream, and bacon etc, but you can create your own delicious plant-based versions that are a lot healthier and cheaper too.

This is another recipe that uses hummus (recipe here) as a condiment instead of cheese or sour cream etc.  It works really well.  We served our spuds on top of a beetroot, corn, and rocket salad, and topped it with some chilli beans and hummus (you could also sprinkle some dukkah over it too, for extra flavour).  I’m finding more and more that you can create a salad with the bits and pieces you have in the fridge – we try to have a jar of gherkins or olives handy to add some flavour to salads, and we use a lot of fresh herbs too – parsley and mint mostly.

We used some pre-made chilli beans we had in the freezer (see this recipe) but you could use a can of chilli beans to speed things up, or fry some onion and garlic, add a can of lentils and some curry flavour for an alternative, or for a more summery accompaniment you could put together a salsa with fresh tomato, coriander, cucumber, some chilli and corn.  Heaps of ways to incorporate plenty of veg and colour on the plate.

Ka pai!

 

 

Satay Tofu and Sesame Rice

Screen Shot 2018-02-04 at 6.52.05 PM

This is another dish we regularly make in our whare because it’s tasty and easy.  Sometimes I stir fry some green beans in a bit of sesame oil with garlic, crushed peanuts, a little soy sauce and some chilli flakes and serve this on the side, or I serve it with some steamed broccoli or other veg.

Kīnaki: Serves 4 (if you serve it with some veggies, more like 2 if you are just doing the tofu)

  • 1 x block of firm tofu, with excess moisture squeezed out (I use a bit of muslin cloth, wrap the tofu up and then place a heavy chopping board or recipe books on top to draw it out)
  • 1 clove minced garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced ginger
  • 1 x spring onion thinly chopped
  • Toasted sesame seeds (optional – for garnish)
  • Rice – 1/2 cup dry rice per person

For sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter (can use crunchy or smooth)
  • 1 tablespoon agave or maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons hot water
  • 1 tablespoon sriracha sauce

Huarahi:

Cook the rice in your preferred method.  While the rice is cooking, remove the excess moisture from the tofu.  You could also toast a few tablespoons of sesame seeds and set these aside if using.

Prepare the satay sauce by combining all ingredients and mixing together thoroughly with a fork.

Cut up the tofu into cubes.  Heat a little oil in a medium-sized pan and fry the garlic and ginger, turn down the heat slightly.  Add the tofu and brown on all sides.  Pour the sauce over the top and stir so that all of the tofu is coated.  The sauce will thicken up.  Continue stirring until it is heated right through.

Serve tofu on rice and garnish with spring onions and toasted sesame seeds.

 

 

Tofu Scramble

tofu

This is a quick and easy dish that is good for when your mates argue that you can’t have a delicious breakfast without bacon and eggs.

It only takes a few minutes and you can jazz it up lots of different ways – serve with some sliced tomato or avocado on the side, or on a toasted bagel or bun with hummus, or stir through some mushrooms, spinach, black beans or capsicum – for this edition I sprinkled some sprouts and dukkah over the top (you could always add some hot sauce too).

Kīnaki (serves 2-3)

  • 1 block of firm style tofu
  • 1 small onion – diced finely
  • 1 clove diced garlic
  • 3 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 1.5 tablespoons nutritional yeast
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
  • A little sesame oil for cooking

Huarahi

Mix together the soy sauce, nutritional yeast, turmeric, cumin and 1 tablespoon of sesame oil and set aside.

Press any excess moisture out of the tofu (I use some muslin cloths for this).

Heat some sesame oil in a frying pan.  When sizzling, add chopped onion and garlic and fry until slightly brown.  Add the tofu by crumbling it into the pan and breaking down any big bits with a wooden spoon.  Add the seasoning mixture and stir to make sure all of the tofu is well coated.

Serve as it is, or on top of toasted bread.

(And a nice mug of coffee).

 

Black Bean Nachos with Hummus

Screen Shot 2017-12-09 at 19.55.49

This is a super-easy recipe.  In our whare, I usually make quite a lot of our kai beforehand and freeze it, as we don’t get home until about 6pm most nights.  This black-bean chilli is one I always have plenty of in the freezer – it goes great with nachos, tacos, or inside tortillas for burritos etc.  I usually double the recipe so we eat some and freeze some the same night.

This is really just a rough guide – I always add in bits of whatever I have in the fridge – mushrooms, handful of spinach, small pieces of broccoli, etc.  And you can use kidney beans instead of black beans – just substitute whatever you have.  This is also nice if you finely dice some kumara and add it in – this works best in the burritos.

Kīnaki (Serves 4)

  • 2 x cloves of garlic finely chopped (or 1.5 teaspoons of crushed garlic)
  • 1 x medium-sized onion finely chopped
  • 1 x can black beans (or kidney beans)
  • Handful of mushrooms finely sliced
  • 1 x finely diced courgette
  • 1 x can of diced tomatoes
  • 1 x teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 x teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1.5 tablespoons smoked paprika (this is key!)
  • 1 x teaspoon chilli flakes
  • 1 x packet of corn chips
  • Salt and pepper to season

For hummus:

  • 1 x heaped teaspoon crushed garlic
  • 1 x can chickpeas
  • 1 x heaped tablespoon of tahini
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Olive oil
  • 1.5 teaspoons ground cumin
  • Salt to taste

Huarahi

In a large saucepan, stir fry the garlic and onion in a little bit of oil.  Once the onions have browned, fry off the spices quickly.  Add a dash of water, and then add i the diced courgette and mushroom and any other chopped fresh vegetables.  Stir fry these for a couple of minutes, and then add the beans and the chopped tomatoes.  Stir ingredients together and then season according to taste.  Leave to cook for a further 15 minutes or so.

For the hummus, mix together all of the ingredients except the chickpeas on the high speed setting in your blender.  Once you have a thick paste, add the drained chickpeas, and a little water so it mixes easily.  Season with salt (I tend to add extra cumin too).  You can also add in fresh herbs, sundried tomatoes, etc.

Serve the veggie mixture on some corn chips and top with hummus – you can also add some guacamole, hot sauce, and/or grated dairy-free cheese.

Creamy Mushroom Pasta

pasta

This is a really easy and tasty dish – the fresh herbs really make it but if you don’t grow your own they can be a bit expensive.  It’s fine to use dry ones, or leave them out.  Just add some extra seasoning (either the nutritional yeast, and some salt and pepper, perhaps even a sprinkle of paprika or smoked paprika to liven it up a bit).  You could possibly use the sauce with the courgette-noodle-not-pasta that a lot of people are into at the moment (see instructions here).

Kīnaki (Serves 4)

  • 4 x cloves of garlic finely chopped (or 3 teaspoons of crushed garlic)
  • 10 or so white button mushrooms thinly sliced
  • 1 x medium-sized onion finely chopped
  • A handful of fresh thyme
  • A handful of fresh parsley
  • 1 x can of coconut cream
  • 1/2 cup nutritional yeast flakes
  • 2 tablespoons of olive oil (or 2 tablespoons of veggie stock for frying the garlic/mushrooms)
  • Dried fettuccine pasta
  • Salt and pepper to season

Huarahi

Bring a pot of water to the boil for the pasta.  Add a pinch of salt, a dash of olive oil and then cook the pasta according to the directions on the packet.  Make sure you stir it occasionally so all of the strands stay separate.

In a large pan, add the olive oil or stock (reserve a little of this for later) and the onion and cook until brown.  Next add the sliced mushrooms and the fresh herbs.  Cook these for a few minutes until the mushrooms are tender.  Take these off the heat and put them on a plate to add to the sauce later.

Return the pan to the stove and add a little more olive oil or stock.  Cook the garlic for a few minutes.  Next add the can of coconut milk and stir.  Once this has started to thicken a little, add the nutritional yeast and some salt and pepper to taste.  You may find the sauce thickens up fine on its own.  If not, you can add some cornflour or arrowroot to thicken the sauce.  If you get a few lumps try and whisk these out (or cheat like me and use a stick blender.)

Finally add the mushrooms and herbs to the sauce.  When the pasta is cooked, drain it and add this to the sauce.  Stir to coat the pasta with the sauce and then serve.  Sprinkle with some freshly chopped parsley, some salt and pepper, and a little nutritional yeast.